Growing Up White

A Veteran Teacher Reflects on Racism

By (author) Julie Landsman

Hardback - £38.00

Publication date:

05 September 2008

Length of book:

200 pages

Publisher

R&L Education

ISBN-13: 9781578868377

Growing Up White is for everyone who wants to know more about our schools, our community, our country, and ourselves. Julie Landsman takes the reader on an inventory of her life, pulling from events and scenes, a set of lessons learned. She discloses honestly and unflinchingly the privileges she has experienced as a white person and connects those to her presence in city classrooms where she taught for over 25 years.

As a teacher Julie made mistakes, learned from them, made more and concludes that understanding race in America is an ongoing process. Her book is rich with suggestions for working in our schools today, where we find a primarily white teaching force and an expanding population of students of color. She believes that these students make our schools rich and exciting places in which to work. Landsman also believes that white teachers can reach their students in deep and positive ways. Because she invites you to go along with her in revealing the basis of her upbringing and her choices, the story itself is engaging. Readers arrive at the final chapters with an appreciation not only for the complexity of our history as individuals around race, gender and class but with real hope in education as a way to create a place where all children get a fair chance at success.

Julie can be reached at jlandsman@goldengate.net.
I applaud Julie Landsman for her courage and candor in vividly illustrating how she and countless others have benefited from white privilege. The reflective exercises and practical strategies that she recommends can enable educators to deal with their own racial baggage, and increase their efficacy with students of color. Because this rich narrative can empower both educators and students, Landsman has made another excellent contribution to the growing body of literature on white privilege, diversity, and "must have conversations."